Osprey Pose Unique Springtime Challenges for Electric Utilities

Posted by Cindy Kemper on Apr 20, 2021 2:00:00 PM

If you have ever driven along a river, the ocean, or a large lake and come across a massive, imposing, messy stick nest on a distribution or transmission power line, chances are you are looking at a nest of an osprey. These large raptors (birds of prey) with a global distribution are well-adapted to specialize on small to large sized fish. They nest along fish-bearing waterbodies - historically in the tops of broken tree snags, but as power poles became common across the landscape, they became valuable real estate for nesting osprey, particularly those near water.  

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Topics: Wildlife Mitigation

Under the Covers: Investigating Animal Mitigation Covers and Infrared Thermography

Posted by Hubbell Power Systems on Apr 13, 2021 8:25:00 AM

Hubbell | Greenjacket Inc. is pleased to announce that it has received permission to distribute a white paper entitled, "Under the Covers: Investigating Animal Mitigation Covers and Infrared Thermography" by Jay Bowen and Will Bauer on the issue of IR Scanning of electrical equipment while it is protected by cover-up.

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Topics: Wildlife Mitigation

Tools in the Toolbox to Minimize Bird-Caused Outages

Posted by Cindy Kemper on Mar 4, 2021 8:00:00 AM

Birds have no doubt been interacting with power lines and substations since the latter first appeared on the landscape. Indeed, the first record of avian collision mortality from power lines dates back to the late 1800’s, and at least one record of electrocution in North America was made as early as 1922. These incidents occur when a bird simultaneously contacts two energized components of a pole that are each at different electrical potential (referred to as a phase-to-phase fault or electrocution), or they simultaneously contact one energized component on a structure and one grounded component (referred to as a phase-to-ground fault or electrocution). These incidents not only cause injury or mortality to the birds themselves, most of which are legally protected, but they also impact the integrity of the power system.

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Topics: Wildlife Mitigation

Greenjacket Creates Custom Wildlife Mitigation Solution to Save Baby Owls

Posted by Cindy Kemper on Jan 29, 2021 9:42:33 AM

Although we are just starting out the new year and snow is covering the ground in much of the USA and Canada, tis’ already the season for romance and courtship for great horned owls, the largest owl in North America, and one of the earliest “spring” nesters. These majestic birds aren’t much for construction or renovation, and instead take over old nests of other birds such as crows and red-tailed hawks. To the frustration of many utilities, they sometimes choose old nests in electrical substations as their chosen spot to raise a family; these substations offer protection from the elements, a heat source (important when incubating eggs, sometimes in temperatures of -30C), and protection from most mammalian predators, thanks to the chain-link fencing. What they don’t realize is the high electrocution potential for themselves and their clumsy fledging young.  

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Topics: Wildlife Mitigation

Asset Management Planning for Wildlife Outage Mitigation Planning

Posted by Darren Barnett on Oct 21, 2020 2:00:00 PM

What should utilities do in a situation where they are having an animal-caused outage issue and do not know where to start when they are planning to install a new substation?

An animal-caused outage mitigation mindset must exist within all levels of a utility’s asset management process in order to completely manage the issue (see Figure 5). Utilities need to look internally to all of their processes to understand where there are examples of practices that work well and should be reinforced and also recognize areas of opportunity. Detailed in this section is a high-level review of the areas that should be reviewed, analyzed, understood, improved upon or implemented, when necessary, to support the drive toward zero animal-caused outages.

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Topics: Wildlife Mitigation

The Cost of Outages. How Much Damage Can an Animal Cause?

Posted by Darren Barnett on Oct 7, 2020 7:00:00 AM

Animal-caused electric outages, like all other outages, can cause direct and consequential damage (such as business interruption) to electric utility facilities, C&I customers, residential utility customers and critical public facilities.

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Topics: Wildlife Mitigation

The Impact of Animal-Caused Outages

Posted by Darren Barnett on Sep 23, 2020 10:00:00 AM

The growing reliance on energy and the implications of its interruption in residential homes, commercial and industrial (“C&I”) facilities, and government agencies places an increasing burden on utilities to provide a more reliable power supply than ever experienced in the history of the electric system (see Figure 1).

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Topics: Wildlife Mitigation

Protecting America’s Birds with Greenjacket

Posted by Darren Barnett on Aug 25, 2020 8:00:00 AM

The Lemon Creek substation is a key site for AEL&P in supplying backup power and electrical distribution to the city of Juneau. It is located near a landfill, a food source attractant to many species of avians. AEL&P had been proactively investigating and testing several avian protection options available in the marketplace. These efforts helped, but there was still a need for further improvement. Following a significant eagle-caused outage that was reported on by the media, the Hubbell Greenjacket Team reached out to AEL&P to offer assistance in solving these issues. 

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Topics: Wildlife Mitigation

5 Ways Animals Cause Fires and How Wildlife Covers Can Help

Posted by Ed LeRouzic on Apr 24, 2020 11:15:00 AM

Looking at recent data from California utilities, about one in ten ignition causes can be traced back to animals either directly or indirectly. That amounts to a significant number of wildfires caused by animal contact alone.

Here are five ways wildlife can cause fires near power lines.

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Topics: Distribution, Substation, Wildfire Mitigation, Wildlife Mitigation